The Right Text Length for a Web Page


Why Make Web Pages a Certain Text Length?

Granted, many web pages might not have much text at all. For instance, apple.com is more focused on showing off the brand than writing text about it. Additionally, some web pages are more like applications than articles for people to read. In these cases, the text length is less important. You should still consider placing more text on your page as it provides more content for users and search engines. If you hadn't heard of Apple before, you would be rather clueless as to what the page is about. Additionally, if you went to search for these web pages, they would be harder to find because search engines can't easily understand the keywords of these pages. Granted, backlinks to these pages with anchor text ultimately help the search engines understand, but more content could help expand their keywords or phrases.

According to several searches and studies that we have performed, web pages with more words tend rank higher, a lot higher, in search engines than other web pages with less words that discuss the same keywords or phrases. Search engines and users alike enjoy longer pages. It gives them more context and more information. Search engines can be more certain that a web page is about a particular keyword or phrase if it can find the term consistently used in more text.

Wikipedia isn't just on the top of the search results for many different keywords because of backlinks. The articles usually contain a large amount of text. This also highlights another benefit of a longer text length for search engines. With more text, search engines gain more context about the keyword. If the content ratio is high enough, the entire document could discuss, in detail, more aspects of the keyword or phrase. For instance, if you look for "Web Page" on Wikipedia (which comes up as the first result in Google at the moment), you will notice that it talks about how browsers use web pages, how web pages are rendered, and many other things a user might want to know about a web page. Search engines see these longer pages as more capable of providing the information that the user wants. Thus, with all other things equal, web pages with a longer text length will rank higher than those with shorter text lengths.

What is the Right Text Length for a Web Page?

The "right" text length for a web page is a very difficult question. A general answer would be that the best text length for your page is however long it takes to describe, in detail, what your web page is about. However, that is not very helpful. Our minimum and maximum length recommendations are certainly not standards, and you should ultimately choose what text is appropriate for your web pages and your users.

Minimum Text Length

During our studies, we were able to discover than the minimum text length for a web page should be more than 500 words. This is adequate for users to receive a detailed description about a particular keyword or phrase. It is also large enough for search engines to understand the context of the page. Web pages that are applications or landing pages could definitely contain less than this number, which would be perfectly fine. For web pages that are articles or trying to rank for multiple keywords, a text length longer than 500 words should be helpful as long as the text is still concise and not stuffed with words.

Maximum Text Length

We found that many web pages around 2000 words in length tended to rank higher than other pages with a shorter text length. This should allow for a large amount of keywords or phrases and gives them a context for users to find the information they needed for their search queries. Search engines will be able to use these web pages with a longer text length when they can't find web pages that are specific enough to match the user's search query. However, Web Pages that have a text length longer than 2500 words probably could be split into multiple pages. At this length, the document has become too long for users to read and the keywords or phrases that they are searching for are now buried in the mountain of text.